Music

Music plays a large part in the liturgical life of St. Luke’s. There are hymns and organ music at the weekly 8:00AM Rite I Eucharist; the Choir is present for the 11:00AM Sung Eucharist Rite II; and on the Third Sunday of the month at 4:30PM we sing Choral Evensong. In addition to the regular services the Choir sings for feast days including Advent Lessons & Carols, and is joined by Strings or Brass for Christmas and Easter.

The Choir has made several tours in recent years which have included residencies at Gloucester Cathedral (UK) in 2014, the National Cathedral (DC) in 2016, a CD recording of Christmas music in 2017, and another UK residency at Ripon Cathedral in 2019. Future plans include a new recording of Motets for the Liturgical Year in 2022, and a tour of Ireland in 2023.

St. Luke's Choir

This is an adult ensemble made up of four section leaders and five choral scholars. We are joined by a complement of volunteers. Rehearsals are at 7 PM on Wednesday evenings, if you are interested in joining us, please contact Russell Jackson – russellj@stlukes-sa.net, 210-828-6425.

Choral Evensong

The Office of Evensong has its roots in the monastic tradition when monks would sing the liturgical hours throughout the night and day. Archbishop Thomas Cranmer combined the Magnificat from Vespers with the Nunc dimittis from Compline, and this was a foundation stone of the Anglican Choral Tradition. Over the centuries many composers have written specific pieces for these texts along with Choral Responses and the Psalms for the Day. There is a line in the Book of Common Prayer (1662) that reads: In quires and places where they sing, here followeth the anthem. The anthem would be something appropriate to the season and would act as a meditation or inspiration to the listener.​

Meet our new Pipe Organ

Our new organ, created by Reuter Org, is designed to perform the French Romantic repertoire as embodied in the works of Franck, Widor, Vierne, through to Dupré and Messiaen. French Romantic symphonic organs are designed to be warm and colorful which make good instruments for church accompaniment as well as representing the most exciting school or organ music. 

There are more than 50 ranks and 3,000 plus pipes, the smallest being about 1/4 inch in length and the largest being 16 feet long.